Tag: FIN entrepreneurs

South King County BDT’s-Outreach-Curso en español

South King County BDT's-Outreach – SeaTac Course in Spanish Orientation Date*: Wednesday August 02, 2017 5:30-9:00 pm *Attendance required to apply for the Business Development Training.

Class Dates & Time: Wednesday nights 6-9 pm, August 9-October 4 Spanish: ¿Usted vive al sur del condado de King y tiene una idea de negocio que le gustaría realizar? ¿Tiene un negocio establecido que quisiera crecer? ¡Véngase a la orientación gratuita de Ventures! Este verano 2017, Ventures y el Food Innovation Network ofrecerán esta oportunidad para empresarios en ¡SeaTac, WA! En una sola sesión, usted aprenderá de cómo el programa de Ventures le podría ayudar a crecer su negocio o su idea de negocio y tendrán la oportunidad de aplicar por nuestro curso inicial para empresarios de pequeños negocios. La orientación es el miércoles 02 de agosto 2017 de las 5:30-9:00 pm, y por primera vez la vamos a ofrecer ¡en SeaTac! La dirección de la orientación: 4040 S 188th St, SeaTac, WA 98188. Espacio es limitado y hay que inscribirse. ¡Más información e inscripción AQUÍ! O también se puede marcar al 206-352-1945 para inscribirse. Location: Lutheran Community Services NW: 4040 188th St., SeaTac, WA 98188 How to register: Online HERE or call 206-352-1945 (se habla español) Cost: Orientation is FREE! If accepted, $50, $100, or $200 class fee based on income

 

Share This:

Soozveen Catering

Startup Q&A: Soozveen Catering

Soozveen is a mediterranean catering company started by two Kurdish-American sisters in Des Moines.  Co-owners Sheelan and Zozan Shamdeen discuss how they got their start and give invaluable advice on beginning a small business.
 
Hours/Availability: All hours, just give us 48 hours notice
Founded: 2013 Contact: 206-734-0932; zshamdeen@gmail.com
 
Q: Tell us about your business?
Soozveen is a Mediterranean catering company run by two Kurdish-American sisters. We cook for events – but really anything more than 5 people. Q: What inspired you to start this business?We always wanted to start a small bakery – ever since we finished high school. We watched our grandmother, mother, and aunts cook all the time. From memorized family recipes, they cooked complicated dishes without measuring a thing, and even when they were exhausted. It was when our mother got sick that we started helping out more in the kitchen. We would cook so much food and then take it to Highline College, where we were working at the time - and still work.The staff and teachers would tell us we made so much food that we should just open a restaurant. Dean Alice Madsen was the first to seriously encourage us to think seriously about opening a business and connected us with classes and support.. We thought it was just going to be a side job and that it would not become anything real but before we knew it there were orders coming in and we were going through the process to formalize our business. Q: What makes you different from other types of catering business? We cook with love. Soozveen actually means ‘the promise of love’. We have a true passion for this work and care about everything from flavors to presentation. There are a lot of Mediterranean/Iraqi restaurants but we are one of only two Kurdish in King County. We are unique in our use of spices that we get from Northern Iraq – it’s really the taste of the land. Our specialty is our stuffed grape leaves (dolma) and baklava. Q: What is your business’ biggest challenge?
Finding clients. Right now, our biggest clients are through our personal and professional networks. Word of mouth is really successful for us but it takes a lot of time. We would really like to build a base of businesses and event spaces to serve.Q: What do you like best about your work? Meeting different people. Hearing people’s experience with our food and making them happy and smile. When people see good food it's easy to forget your worries. We don’t like to change the recipes, we want to keep it like we cook it at home for our families. But we make a lot of dishes and it’s just a matter of finding the right dishes for a client’s palette. We do, however, make a big effort to meet people’s dietary and health needs. Some things we may bake rather than use the traditional methods of frying in oil because a lot of people have become so health conscious and we want to meet those needs. Q: What is something people might be surprised to learn about you or your business? There is a story behind every dish – you will have to ask us when you make an order. The other thing is that people have a lot of misperceptions about middle eastern people – one thing you may not know is how open and welcoming our culture is – to eat together brings people together. To go to a middle eastern person’s house is to eat a lot of food – food is how we share our stories and our love for each other. Even a very poor person will find a way to share food with a guest. Q: What types of services or programs have been helpful? StartZone at Highline College has a lot of workshops around marketing, labelling, accounting. Project Feast helped us in nutrition and food safety. FIN has helped us to get our business license and permits and to connect us with more people – to help us build our network. Ventures provided training to help us understand how to plan and run a business. Q: What would you say to other small food business owners thinking of working with FIN? There are so many opportunities out there, you just have to believe in yourself. But at the same time, be prepared. There are a lot of logistics you need to learn – things will not happen right away and you need to take the time to be prepared and don’t react out of a sense of urgency. Believe in yourself and you must believe in any organization you are working with, the trust must be there when you are getting help from someone. 
Connect with Soozveen to make an order or volunteer. P.S. They would love help with professional photography and designing a website.

 

Share This:

It’s official…FIN Entrepreneurs have launched!

FIN is excited to support the launch of four new local caterers cooking out of our shared commercial kitchen in Kent. The catering businesses each received a small start-up grant and reduced rent fees and are now fully licensed and insured caterers. FIN partner, Project Feast, is a core tenant, training culinary apprentices who operate the lunch cafe, Cafe Ubuntu. FIN is working closely with partners Ventures, StartZone and Center for Inclusive Entrepreneurship to ensure each entrepreneur is matched with a business coach, receives ongoing training and identifies market opportunities such as catering events, farmers markets, and festivals. The seven entrepreneurs are operating under 4 catering businesses and will be cooking up cuisines from around the world. Swahili Seattle Food, Soozveen, Rekebot Coffee House and Mian Dian cater dishes and flavors from Kenya, Iraq, Ethiopia and China. Many thanks for the support from Seattle Foundation, Communities of Opportunity, Port of Seattle, and City of Kent. Their generous support has helped FIN and partners to build out the commercial kitchen and ensure the entrepreneurs and apprentices have the support services needed. And a special thank you to Project Feast for spending the many hours managing the remodeling project!   If you have a catering or special event coming up, please give a FIN entrepreneur a call!

 

Share This:

First Step (South Seattle)

Neighborhood House 
This four-week series includes First Step Idea Session: From Idea to Startup, Does Your Idea Make Financial Sense, and a session on personal readiness. This workshop or equivalent is required to receive free one-on-one business advising from CIE. To register, or ask questions, email communityenterprise@cie-nw.org

 

Share This:

First Step – Week 1 (Lynnwood)

CommunityEnterprise offers accessible and affordable "first step" entrepreneurship training, consulting and other support, empowering people in low-wealth and underserved communities to start and grow profitable small businesses sustainably connected to a local, living economy. The First Step series is essential for those who want to start a business. It is not a “How to Start a Business” class. Instead, it will help you assess your readiness and the feasibility of your business idea and business goals. Classes meet for 2 hours a week, for 3 weeks. Apply online at www.cie-nw.org/apply or email communityenterprise@cie-nw.org for more information.  

 

Share This:

FIN’s newest staff member shares views on cultural identity as an Iraqi-American.

Sheelan Shamdeen, FIN Program Assistant

Sheelan Shamdeen, a Kurdish-Iraqi refugee, began working with FIN as a graduate of Project Feast’s Apprenticeship Program. Also a client of StartZone at Highline College, she and her sister found support in planning their own Iraqi catering company - Soozveen. But catering is only a small part of her story. In fact, Sheelan looks at their catering company as tool to bridge her two identities as a Kursdish-Iraqi refugee and an American citizen – food is a platform for dialogue she says. “We had 24 hours to leave and weren’t sure where we were going.” Sheelan and her family fled Iraq in 1996 when Saddam Hussein announced anyone associated with the UN would be publicly hanged. They, along with countless others, spent 3 nights under a tent with no passports - their only keepsake from home a teddy bear her sister had saved. Although they were safe once they reached Turkey, they had a long unknown journey ahead of them. Arriving in Guam, many families squeezed into tight living quarters for months while official paperwork was filed to enter the US with green cards. Twenty years later Sheelan, her mother, and seven siblings are all US citizens. Many of those years have been spent teaching English to other immigrants and refugees at Highline College. Although she remembers every detail of her life in Iraq, she also embraces American culture and encourages newcomers to do the same. “Many refugees feel this is only temporary – that this is not their home. But this is the place that helped my family survive and I believe I have two homes now.” To her, she is truly accepted in America as a human being - not a Muslim or an Iraqi but as a person. Despite the things sometimes said in media and politics, she feels like she belongs here. Sheelan doesn’t want any immigrant to lose their language or culture but believes it is important to also feel at home here. In America it is possible to celebrate both patriotism and cultural diversity in the same breath. Sharing Iraqi food with people is just one way that she can start conversations about cultural identity. A dish made during Project Feast trainingOver two years have passed since Sheelan was first introduced to FIN. She was part of the first group of Community Food Advocates, recently joined the first cohort FIN Entrepreneurs and, in September 2016, took a staff position as FIN’s Program Assistant. Being a refugee means Sheelan knows what it feels like to start something from nothing. She brings compassion into her work and is quick to respond in a moment of need. All she asks of those around her is to be open minded. Sheelan's advice to all people: “Ask questions before assuming you know someone’s story. Keep learning –there are so many free resources out there. And if you can’t find anything to learn then start a conversation with someone new.”
by Allison Mountjoy January 9, 2017, 10:30AM PST

 

Share This:

Pilot Kitchen is coming together!

Anchor tenant and FIN partner Project Feast, is working hard with us to get the Pilot Kitchen ready to use. Project Feast’s apprentice program and the first FIN entrepreneur cohort will begin using the space in August this year. Stay tuned for photos!

 

Share This:

FIN has an official Pilot Kitchen!

After over 6 months of looking, FIN has officially secured a space for our Pilot Kitchen, located in the Kent Partnership Development Building. We faced many challenges trying to find an available kitchen space within SeaTac or Tukwila; reinforcing the timeliness of our work and dedication to creating durable resources in SeaTac and Tukwila. It is in the Pilot Kitchen that we will work to test our service coordination and model business incubation with the first cohort of FIN entrepreneurs. This work will help us become ready to enter the FIN Center, slated to open in 2018.

 

Share This:

The first cohort of FIN Entrepreneurs convened today

The entrepreneurs had their first meeting together today. We had a great discussion on peer learning opportunities, business development trainings and rent structures for the pilot kitchen space. The entrepreneurs will begin meeting monthly and will be doing a training on pricing this month. Meanwhile, we continue exploring other kitchen facilities in the area and have a couple leads.

 

Share This: