Tag: food systems

Conference Reflections – Equity in Organizations

At the end of last year, we sent several advocates to the Community Food Systems Conference. Here's what they learned...

My general perception is that the conference central topics were farming and projects/programs related to farming.  One of the workshops that I attended talked about doing partnerships with churches that have land to offer farming opportunities for low-income families. I am convinced that FIN has to be innovative in building new partnerships.

I noticed that most of the non-profits had white board members but serve immigrant and refugee communities. I like that FIN is inclusive and gives the opportunity to advocates to be part of the steering committee and being part of the voices that make decisions. However, we do need to have more visibility in the community. I think that seeing from others and learning from other organizations around will give us the opportunity to improve FIN work. I am proud about FIN diversity in the steering committee and community/partners - our mission and vision are led by the people that we serve.  I like that we are listened to as FIN Advocates. The advocates are the most authentic members of FIN, they are the connection with the community and their needs.

-Jaqueline Garcia, FIN Advocate

 

Share This:

Conference Reflections – Social Justice & Farming

At the end of last year, we sent several advocates to the Community Food Systems Conference. Here's what they learned...

The conferences were informative. The conference was packed full of topics, like food, community and organizational involvement, healthy eating, nutrition, social justice, gardening, and farming. It promoted public markets and encouraged better use of SNAP benefits. I was particularly inspired by the food justice workshops that were lead by Native Americans. They focused on teaching children the importance of farming, gardening, land, nature, and spirit. There is a focus on where food comes from and they want children to understand and appreciate the idea of farming and gardening.My takeaway for FIN is the importance of working with children. We should invite or visit schools to promote healthy eating, farming, and gardening. I believe it’s important for children to know the source of food they eat every day.-Zozan Shamdeen, FIN Advocate

 

Share This:

Conference Reflections – Farm to School

At the end of last year, we sent several advocates to the Community Food Systems Conference. Here's what they learned...

I learned about movement-building in food systems: the case of Puerto Rico, how people have the ability to sustain themselves, besides early colonial context, production, focused on exportation. Most of their produce comes from outside of the island. They are building a network collectively with people who want to work the land and have little or none knowledge of farming. Children start to learn about farming since first grade through third grade, they are bringing agricultural back and they are applying to math and science concepts. They are trying to influence in Public policy, GMO and pesticide regulation.I also enjoyed Winona LaDuke talk.  She mentioned that abundance is the nature of life and discussed how to make America great again in the food access context. We need to farm something to feed our soul. We are interested in feeding the next generation of our people, this is where we will restore the food system.More consumers are seeking farm-fresh food and more farmers,-especially small- and mid-size operations are profiting from these new markers. I learned that every year the USDA awards up to $5 million in grants to help schools connect with local producers and teach children where their food comes from.As a FIN member, I think we can look for partnerships in schools to provide farming support to the children. Favorite Quote: “A country  that doesn’t produce  what it eats is not free”  Jesus VazquezThanks FIN for such a great learning experience!-Gladis Clemente, FIN Advocate

 

Share This: